My Favorite Toys for Imaginative Play

Imaginative play is one of the most important forms of play for children ages 3-7. While using their imaginations, children learn how to interact with the world and other people. They can problem solve, explore emotional issues, and develop cognitive skills. Here are some of my favorite toys for imaginative play.

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My Favorite Toys — Board Games for Problem Solving and Strategy

From an OT point of view, board and card games are the best. Games promote fine motor skills, visual perceptual skills, planning, social skills, and problem-solving. However, as a mom, some games just aren’t fun for a wide range of ages. Here are my winners–games that work for kids (and adults) of all ages.

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My Favorite Toys — Fidget Toys for Focus and Hand Strength

As an OT, I love the new interest in fidget toys. Many of them promote hand strength, increase a child’s ability to focus for longer and can even help you deal with stress. However, not all fidget toys work for everyone and some work better than others. Here is a list of some of my favorites and why.

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My Favorite Toys — Rock Crayons for Developing Good Pencil Grip

As an occupational therapist, I cringe when I see a child being encouraged to learn to write before they have developed a proper pencil grip. Your child needs to work on developing a grasp that uses the tips of their fingers. Rock Crayons are a great way of helping your young child build the muscle strength needed for a proper pencil grip. And they are fun!

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Identifying 10 Signs of Reading Readiness

Is your child ready to read?  In today’s educational world, this question is not being asked enough.  Instead, we skip worrying about being ready and throw our 3, 4 and 5-year-old children into reading programs in hopes that they will be launched into academic success.  Research indicates that forcing a child to learn to read… Read More

Homeschooling Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory Processing Disorder, or SPD, can make any kind of schooling challenging. Children with SPD don’t process the world the same as other children. Thankfully, with a home educational program, you can give your child the education they deserve and help them regulate their sensory system at the same time.

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