Building The Perfect Kindergarten Year

If you ask homeschooling friends what to do for homeschooling kindergarten, you may feel you have only two options: An academic year full of curriculum, or unschooling. There is at least one more choice: Developmental kindergarten.

Collins Academy, A different kind of help for Homeschoolers

Recently, I had a chance to interview Sarah Collins, OTR of Collins Academy Therapy Services. Sarah is a homeschooling Occupational Therapist and she offers a unique form of help for homeschooling families who have kids with learning challenges, special needs, or those who just want some special guidance.

OT at Home: Brownies

If your child has been getting occupational therapy, this social distancing thing has probably put a wrench in that plan. Some kids are able to do OT via video conferencing, but not all. So, I’m here to give you some ideas on how to work with your child at home.

Sensory Needs? Install a swing!

Are your kids missing all the playgrounds? Mine are! Our typical homeschool week tends to include visits to playgrounds. My kids particularly love swinging. But our current situation requires we find ways at home to fill that need.

My Favorite Toys — Bop It!

I have a new favorite toy for homeschooling. It gives my kid great sensory input and a fun brain break. Check out why I love Bop It!

Quick Question: What is copy work?

Copy work is mentioned in many places in the homeschooling world. It is even included in most Five Senses Literature Lessons programs. Copy work means you select a word, sentence, or passage from a book and have your child copy it. As an occupational therapist, I am a huge fan of copy work!

Give them Scissors!

Scissors teach wonderful skills, build the brain and body connection, and prepare kids for real-life problems. Too many parents have told me they were afraid to give their child scissors. Kids need those skills and too many today lack good fine motor skills.

Why OT’s Tell You to Learn Capital Letters First

There are many different approaches to teaching children to write. Most teach lowercase letters in conjunction with the uppercase letters. But this approach is flawed. Teaching children to write with capital letters first is the better strategy.

What are we working on?

What would it look like to teach letters, numbers, shapes, and colors the Five Senses Literature Lessons way? Take a look to find out! We are excited to announce that we are working on a new program for the Orange Level, Fundamentals and Foundations!